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Animal models

Research Field Animal models

Womb with a View

| Roisin McGuigan

Will premature infants soon be able to return to a uterine environment to finish their development?

Tools & Techniques Cell & gene therapy

Small(er) Sequence, Big(ger) Promise

| Ruth Steer

CRISPR gene editing with a newly characterized orthologue may bring the approach closer to the clinic.

Tools & Techniques Animal models

An End to Animal Testing is Not Yet in Sight

| Sandy Mackay, Bella Williams

We need alternatives but, right now, in vivo methods might be the best option we have

Tools & Techniques Imaging

Amazing Animals (The Art of Translation)

Incredible images of the animal models that play such a vital role in medical research

Tools & Techniques Drug discovery

When is a Negative a Positive?

| Robert S. Kerbel

We need to change attitudes towards publishing "negative" results

Tools & Techniques Animal models

Lost in Translation?

| Pascal Sanchez, Steve Finkbeiner, Kate Possin

Scientists from opposite ends of the translational spectrum have teamed up to help solve a pressing problem in Alzheimer’s research. By creating a human equivalent to the water mazes used in rodent studies, they hope to allow easier comparison of data from animal and human studies.

Tools & Techniques Animal models

One Step Forward...

| William Aryitey

Stem cells restore function to damaged spinal cords in rats

Tools & Techniques Cell & gene therapy

Stemming the Flow

| Paris Margaritis

A gene therapy approach for hemophilia-causing Factor VII deficiency shows early promise

Tools & Techniques Cancer

PD-1 on the Brain

| William Aryitey

Revolutionary cancer immunotherapies appear to alleviate Alzheimer’s symptoms in mice

Research Field Neuroscience

Bargain Brains

| Diane Hoffman-Kim

In some ways, we biomedical engineers are really just control freaks. By designing our own small world in a dish, we can stage manage every aspect and push the boundaries in a way that’s not always possible in an animal model.

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