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Tools & Techniques Omics

The Next Next Generation

Over the last 10 years, next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized genome analysis; we can now sequence the whole genome of an individual within a couple days for less than €5,000. To put that into perspective, it took several years and US $3 million to obtain the first draft of the human genome by Sanger sequencing!

“Massively parallel sequencing” is another term used for NGS, because it produces hundreds of reads of the same sequence and allows the sequencing of numerous fragments from different individuals at the same time. Whereas Sanger sequencing was able to produce 300,000 base pairs (bp) per run at most, NGS can sequence as much as 1,800 Gbp of DNA (1.8x1012 bp) in one run. This is a very important development.

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About the Author

Benoit Arveiler

Benoit Arveiler is professor of medical genetics at the University of Bordeaux and University Hospital of Bordeaux, France.

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